The Global Investor

Episode 6: Greg Adams, founder and CEO of Stabilitas — Making the World Safer through AI Driven Security

July 16, 2019 Season 1 Episode 6
The Global Investor
Episode 6: Greg Adams, founder and CEO of Stabilitas — Making the World Safer through AI Driven Security
Chapters
The Global Investor
Episode 6: Greg Adams, founder and CEO of Stabilitas — Making the World Safer through AI Driven Security
Jul 16, 2019 Season 1 Episode 6
Obris Podcast by Crown Private
We talk to Greg Adams, former Special Forces Team Leader and Founder of Stabilitas, about making the world a safer place.
Show Notes Transcript

Greg Adams was a Special Forces Team Leader in western Afghanistan.  He was responsible for coordinating with multiple types of organizations - from government to NGO to business - from US to Afghanistan to NATO partners.  He needed a common operating picture - to support a Common Operating Environment - particularly for keeping people safe.  He decided to build it.

In 2015, Greg along with his classmate from West Point Military Academy and Harvard School of Business, Chris Hurst, created Stabilitas. Obris invested in the seed round of funding, and we have been pleased with the development of Stabilitas ever since.

Given their significant growth, the success of our investment so far, and the unique solution they provide in global security, we believe that our viewers and listeners will be intrigued by an interview with Greg.

https://www.stabilitas.io

Speaker 1:
0:10
[inaudible].
Speaker 2:
0:12
Welcome to the global investor podcast. The goal of this podcast is to offer investors and entrepreneurs insights and practical advice to dramatically improve the kinds of deals that you invest in and the returns that you get. My name is James Evanson. I am one of the partners at crown private. If you're unfamiliar with Obras, we are a membership syndicate of investors. Our membership and our community are built up of likeminded, yet unique and often adventurous individuals and family offices. Today I will be interviewing Greg Adams, who is one of the co founders and the CEO of Stability Os. This is a company that we as Oprah's, uh, invested in back when they first started. Uh, Greg was a special forces team leader in western Afghanistan for the u s military. He was responsible for coordinating multiple types of organizations from government to NGO to business, uh, from the u s to Afghanistan and, uh, to NATO partners.
Speaker 2:
1:19
He needed a common operating picture to support a camaraderie, common operating environment, particularly for keeping people safe. And so Greg decided to build it in t 2015 Greg along with his classmate, uh, Chris Hearst from their classmates at West Point military academy as well as Harvard, uh, for graduate school. Uh, they created stability for us. Well, we invested in their seed round of funding and we've been pleased with the development of stability us ever since. So I'm very pleased to introduce Greg to you folks today and enjoy the podcast. Welcome Greg. James, thanks for having me on. It's good to, good to talk to you again now remotely versus in person in Portland. Absolutely. That was a bit, a little over a year ago, another rainy day, uh, that when we, uh, when we met up. So where do we find you today? I'm in Seattle, so I have found a little, little spot that I get a chat with you and try to stay, stay out of the hustle and flow of a, of, of the office right now.
Speaker 2:
2:23
So hopefully there isn't any chaos going on in the background. Well, let's just dive right in. I gave everybody a brief introduction on you. Uh, uh, we're going to, we're going to dig into stability and Greg as well as, uh, uh, kind of where you guys, where you've been and where you're going. So let's start off with the, in general terms, uh, stability, tosses about security. So what problem or problems are you solving in the world? Well, so you know, fundamentally like what, what is sick security about? To me, uh, security is about understanding what's happening in the world so you can take action. We look at that in terms of being able to take action to protect assets or operations. But really getting to that understanding of the world is, is what stability tosses about that building a platform for that, that, that others can build on.
Speaker 2:
3:18
Big picture that's getting after like our real ambition as a company. Um, you know, I, I can dive into a little bit more of the details, but our beachhead product is definitely serving the security space where we think we've been smart as far as our going go to market. We know many of the problems that, uh, security managers face as far as understanding the massive amounts of information that are out there, uh, that are, uh, that could, uh, relate to assets and are moving around the world. Uh, you know, physical assets, like people, uh, vehicles. It could be, uh, parts of a company's supply chain. So we generally deal with, uh, global companies that have a lot of stuff. And, you know, the bottom line is things happen and then it's happened every day and they impact the operations for companies. They make people rate, uh, they could, uh, damage or, um, you know, cause other kind of carm to a corporate assets that are really important for, you know, delivering to the bottom line.
Speaker 2:
4:20
And so we tried to help companies, uh, bind anything that's going to impact, uh, their company in their corporate assets as fast as possible. Uh, understand weather in how that information is relevant to them and they'd give them an ability to, to take action. Okay. Um, you mentioned global companies. Can you be more specific in terms of who you're going or don't want to dive into? The, the exact, uh, the exact customers, but I would say they, no, I don't think that we don't, we don't have to do that. I know you have, you have quite a number of contracts but just kind of in blue little more specifically. And so our customers fall into two, four, uh, segments for us right now. Um, the, the first customers that we started working with are really manufacturing and Pharma com companies that had really global supply chains.
Speaker 2:
5:12
Um, the, you know, in another segment is media, sports and entertainment. So super high value assets like, you know, basketball players, things like that, uh, that are playing in a different city. And the security team needs to know, uh, Hey, what are the risks that we might be facing there? Um, obviously relates directly to the bottom line of, uh, state professional basketball team. Um, you know, and then we serve, uh, security companies directly cause many of them can't develop their, their own software. Uh, and finally, uh, we have, uh, really started to expand in the, in the travel space delivering, uh, pre travel advice and, um, really breaking news information for people that might be traveling. So that's, you know, has really wide range and kind of market impact far as that the number of companies that we can get to. They're working with travel management companies to as a, as a channel.
Speaker 2:
6:03
Are you actually serving that group already? Yes, yes. We have, you know, more than 1700 companies data moving through our platform and being analyzed to understand if there are any risks on, in route really and around. Okay. Okay. Well, this time last year I was, I had a meeting in cell Paul around set of Sao Paulo and I could've really used some resources like yours in terms of, uh, navigating through what were my risks, where I was going. I knew that my ultimate destination was safe, but once I landed in Sao Paulo, uh, I, I needed to chart chart my trip my way through to a, in a sense, I was an asset to my company that needed right protected. Uh, for fortunately I found that. So you, so you, you guys drill down to that level of secure of providing security to individuals and we do well, so we, we haven't done anything in the consumer space thus far.
Speaker 2:
7:03
I mean, we, we've worked with, with companies with a clear, uh, clearly defined security role and in the travel space we've started working with the travel portion of, of a company. But we're doing it through a travel management companies is a, is a partner, um, you know, with what's interesting is, is what you said like, Hey, your destination may be safe. There may not be a whole lot of risks along the way, but really because, you know, we're moving around so quickly, it's hard to get that information, uh, where you might have a trip that, you know, you have a couple of stops and how do you get granular information about what's on the ground? You know, our approach is that the only way to do that is to put machines to work, to, to read everything that's available out there. Uh, try to bring some structure to it that we can deliver insights to you based on what we know you need.
Speaker 2:
7:54
Got It. I don't want to go into your, uh, what is, uh, it wouldn't be fair to you to go into and ask you exactly what your, uh, um, see secret sauces. But it sounds to me that it is, uh, a bit of you, you drawing together all the possible data and then using technology and am I correct to say artificial intelligence to be able to keep IX building upon that and building upon that? Yes. We have a machine learning product and you know, that is, we use machines not unlike human beings do to, to read and uh, it's called normalizing data. So, you know, Eh, human beings incredible. We can look through a lot of information out there and really find what the insights are pretty quickly. But when you're trying to do that at scale in a world where the actual amount of information is growing exponentially that human beings can't do.
Speaker 2:
8:49
So we really use a machine suit, augment all of us categorize, uh, information that we find in both structured data sources or this could be coming from the government, um, or sensors that are out there in the world, like the USDS, uh, weather sensors, uh, in, we do it called normalization. So we bring that together, uh, with, uh, unstructured sources of data like the news, uh, social media, things like that, or even provided for, you know, potentially from, uh, people that want to contribute information to the platform. Uh, really what we're trying to do is understand that there's, hey, one event that's happening and build out a story about that event. Uh, as it's ongoing. It's almost like writing down history as it's happening and every, not just, just leaving that to people. Is your goal to also be able to predict what's coming? Yeah, I mean, I mean that's it.
Speaker 2:
9:44
That's what you say about, you know, history in general, right. Um, we are looking to take these, these insights that you would get from an interview vent and understand, oh, this is what's happened in the past. These are the contributing factors to [inaudible]. There's some simple cases where, um, you know, you've seen it before, such as, you know, when we look at the, the, the terrible wildfires in California last year. If you look at those events, like, okay, you're in mountainous territory, you've had a wildfire, a, the next thing that happens is there's a rainstorm. And you know, we have rainstorms in wildfires and steep terrain and California. You get mud slides. This has happened before. So being able to see those events and understand that they're happening, you know, another one that you'll see is like if there's an earthquake near an airport or something like that, you're going to have to shut down the airport to, uh, check the runway for cracks, things like that.
Speaker 2:
10:38
And so, um, there's some simple leaps that we can make and then we want to get more complex about, uh, the predictions that we make going forward in get further into the future about longer running trends, which he has tremendous market potential. Right. Gotcha. What's your competition look like? So, I mean, I think there's the, the competition for where we sit now. Like we have a beachhead market, uh, you know, described a security customer that, uh, we're really as cofounders, Chris and I can relate to them. Chris has been an enterprise risk manager at a firm before and you know, in the, in the military I often was that, you know, basically wearing the enterprise risk manager mat hat, trying to manage a risk in the community. Um, but it, we are serving that market first. And so the competition first there is from, you know, large companies like, like ever bridge, uh, that, you know, really, we see delivering mass certifications and, and, uh, you know, some, some intelligence products that will be where they're, they're going.
Speaker 2:
11:46
Um, but that's just, that's a beachhead product for us. Like, uh, we look at what we're selling in the market right now is something of a reference app for what we call that, the critical event knowledge graph. So if, you know, if Google's I knowledge graph for that the world, then we're building one for, for critical events and understanding the events that matter to us. Can you explain what that means? Um, so when you think about the, how you would predict the future, like we, we use, uh, a graph. So, uh, we have to build out events as they're happening in real time, understanding what the attributes are, all of these events. So the location, the time, um, you know, what, uh, entities might be mentioned in conjunction with that event, whether it's a, a company, uh, the name of a city, uh, the like the impact or magnitude of the event.
Speaker 2:
12:39
But we, you know, build those relationships and it's through, you know, the pieces of those relationships. Uh, but time, location, uh, that you're able to make a prediction about the future or you grab, gather a deeper understanding about something that's happened in the past, you know, uh, if you were to go, uh, at the place that I'm standing in Seattle and be able to kind of mind what's happened here over time, it's like being able to turn back the pages in the book about this particular place that that's part of what we get from a graph. I don't know if that explanation or another, uh, listeners, uh, in those watching, uh, would, would understand the context as well. Yeah, I think it's a really exciting, I mean, draft concepts, uh, are, I mean any x, y axis is, is a, is a [inaudible] graph, right? Like where you have the relationship between, uh, you know, to, um, you know, different scalars.
Speaker 2:
13:39
But the, uh, the idea as far as an event knowledge graph means that we have a, an amount of fuzziness. Like, well, you don't know if this is really an event. And then you get more sources of information that kind of corroborated something. Uh, and you build that into to something that we would call a, an event over time in, you know, there are other, um, kind of, uh, things that we can compare it to like the social graph, like in Facebook or linkedin. Those, those are graphs where you and I are nodes on the graph and then we've got all these other attributes to us that we can use to find relationships. Like we've worked at the same company. Something like that. We do something similar with say, location around events or time around events. Well, I would think that it would be quite useful for a law enforcement to agencies.
Speaker 2:
14:29
You know, the, the um, the application here are like tremendous and uh, w limitless as far as what we can think about doing going forward. You know, we haven't worked in, in law enforcement yet, but you know, if we are really delivering on the ambition that, that Chris and I have for company and the team shares, yes we want law enforcement to be able to use us. Because what's crazy and what we see in the data right now is that, you know, the, the Seattle police department, they have a different data structure than King County than the state of Washington. And so we normalize that data as well. So we make it readable, you know, across departments so that the fire department and the police department and you know, the sheriff can kind of all see what's really happening on the ground at the same time.
Speaker 2:
15:22
And this, this is a massive, massive problem. Now I think in the world that I'd like to live in, I would like for, you know, FEMA to be looking at the same database as, you know, my corporate customers is the insurance provider is the national guard to understand what's going on. And we see, you know, NGOs that are springing up out there that are doing things like first response to disasters in like, uh, Houston. Uh, there were, there were crowdsource responses. They should have something easy to build upon and that's what stability is provided something easy to build upon. What do you mean by that? Um, so we want to be a data layer that can serve, serve those customers like FEMA, like uh, if, if crowds stores rescue, wants to build a front end, um, and understand like, hey this is, this is where the flood line is, this is where the water level is right now and these are the, the houses that, that need a first responder. Then I would like them to build their front end. But pull the data from stability os cause I data normalization is the hard part. Building a, a user, a UI, a that can be in a web dashboard is not the hard part. [inaudible]
Speaker 2:
16:33
on that. Sure. Let's talk about you and Chris. So Christmas is, you're a partner in cofounder in this group. And a I shared in the introduction that your, your background west point as well as Harvard, uh, what is fired you guys to quit your day jobs and, uh, create stability wise. Yeah. So, you know, for, for me, this started, you know, in a mud hut in Afghanistan, kind of trying to figure out how we would, uh, how I could do my job better, but like, how do we anticipate what's going to happen? How do we know if, you know, we, we do like a local development project or if we're working with the local government, how can we really reduce violence in, uh, the village that, that I was, was living in working in it. And you know, that that was the case for me.
Speaker 2:
17:30
I came together with Chris at Harvard and while interviewing for, to, to go to the, uh, the MPID program, like a, it's a data science primer at, at Harvard and you know, he had similar questions. Uh, you know, he'd been in the military, he'd worked, um, uh, on airfields in Afghanistan, and he was trying to protect his employees that were, that were traveling there. And it was really also trying to understand, hey, how do we know that, that the work that we are doing here matters and how do we influence the outcome both in terms of safety for their employees and you know, for operational effectiveness, like lowering violence in Afghanistan. And so, you know, with, with his advice, they applied to it that the program that we came together on and we really, you know, over a few years started to see the real potential of, uh, data to give us better insights, some on the problems that we're facing.
Speaker 2:
18:28
And, um, you know, we, we kind of tested things with a military audience and thought that, you know, some of the audience wasn't yet ready for, for what we were building. Uh, but the corporate security space, it seemed like there was a real demand to understand, uh, quickly what's happening out there in the world, who was impacted and give them a way to take action. And so that, that is why we went after, uh, corporate securities is there beach at market and like we find deep meaning there as well as, you know, the chance to really build out a product that can have a, a greater impact in the world. Gotcha, Gotcha. Gotcha. Um, tell us more about what the current product looks like. Uh, where, uh, so the current product looks, you know, I think if you're a developer that the product looks like in API, I mean that is the user experience where you're able to, to, to, uh, you know, uh, pull, pull data from Seville, toss or get data pushed from stability os to your own product.
Speaker 2:
19:37
We dog food that through our, uh, our own front end, which we've sold, sold into the corporate security space. So really we're like a reference customer for the, the knowledge graft product. Um, and that looks like, you know, it's basically built around a Google maps. It has, you know, some, uh, notification functionality built in. So we can send Emma SMS push notifications. You can get to email through this bill Taz dashboard. But really we're, since we're in many ways like digitizing events that happened in the real world. Um, you know, we show a map of the world and we show those events as they're happening in the map. As you zoom in on the map, they become more granular. You get more information. But we start with this worldview. Uh, we can tell you where your assets are, where something might be happening along with those assets, uh, and give you a prioritize feed of information, uh, as well.
Speaker 2:
20:33
So if I'm your car, if I'm your, uh, your client and, uh, uh, I have an asset that's moving across the globe somewhere, are we able to track that item in, in real time? Yeah. There. So we can do it in real time if we have a, if you, if you're using our mobile app, um, and we also can anticipate where you're going to be if we have your, your flight reservations. Like I said, we work with more than 1700, uh, commercial, uh, companies that, that have people traveling all over the world. We try to anticipate where they're going to go and send them some information in advance that might influence their, their planning. Um, and so you can visualize that as well where you have all of your employees or other assets and uh, those that may be moving in the near future that we know are going to move in the near future.
Speaker 2:
21:26
We can help you visualize those as well. Well, how far in advance are we? Are you able to predict? It depends on the, the, the customer. Um, it's really, when do you want to know, uh, about, uh, you know, if you're traveling to Paris next week or um, if you're traveling to Brazil, like, uh, we can tell you a week out, we can tell you a couple of weeks out. Of course that situation changes as you get closer and closer. And that is some of the advantage of what we're doing is that because we give real time updates, you're getting a fluid picture of what's happening on the ground and it changes so that you can adjust. Right, right. So we're talking right now, we're talking mostly about people, but there are other, if you're working for corporation or clients as corporations, you also have other assets. For example, thinking of a, a, a product that needs to get to its destination in a certain time that is very time sensitive, whether it's a corporate or a government product or it could even be a healthcare related product that must be, and it can imagine that you guys are able to, uh, predict, uh, if it needs to be rerouted because of problems somewhere.
Speaker 2:
22:35
Is that, is that, well, and this is going to become more in more of an issue when you start thinking about every one of those packages kind of being a package, you know, it's being shipped by a Walmart or Amazon. People are going to continue to want to know where it is and what impact may be to this, this movement of goods. And we're going to get more and more granular about where the, those, those goods are. Um, so right now, you know, good examples of things that we have done. There are uh, you know, helping people keep track of their fleets and understand whether, you know, a truck is on time, uh, in its movement, uh, areas that, that we see real promise are like, Hey, if I'm putting a shipment on a, on a reefer truck, but the temperature's only 30 degrees out, maybe I don't need to put it on that a reefer truck, maybe I could use that irregular truck and save some of that. The cost, for example, a, so there's a, a lot of potential here where really this is just about understanding ground truth about what's going on in our physical world and relating that to, uh, you know, the, the assets that we have moving around in it. Yeah. How does this affect your day to day living? Do you, you keep the map up to, to see what, uh, what you might encounter? Do you, do you are able to bypass traffic?
Speaker 2:
23:56
It's something nice for me is that I'm able to to, uh, jogger or walk to ride my bike to the office. Uh, so, but, uh, our CTO actually, uh, because he has to make a little bit of a communion, he does use it every single day. So he's really super team, even better than the mentally the neighborhood. Uh, and you know, to, to monitor like family seeing things like, uh, like low quality air alerts and things like that for, you know, family on the other side of that, uh, of the world. Um, you know, it's definitely close to home, everything that that's happening with stability to us every day. Right. Well, you know, I remember last year when we were sitting in a coffee shop in Portland and you pulled up the map, a map on your computer and I was really surprised by how much was going on or just just right around within a couple of miles of us.
Speaker 2:
24:50
And, uh, again, I can imagine be easy to get paranoid about, uh, about those things. But at the same time, I think that a real positive on that is if you guys are gathering data from the entire planet, you should be able to predict what things we really don't need to worry about. And things that we do need to be certainly about. Yeah, I think so. I think the world's become more volatile in uncertain at the same time, like generally our lifespans of like increased and there's less, you know, global violence overall. Like, you know, I, I don't think we're, we're trying to, to scare anybody. We're trying to, to deliver ground truth about what, what's going on out there in the world so we can all have a better understanding of it and make better decisions going forward in the future. But if you don't understand what's actually happening in your community every day, how can you be a good advocate for policy in your community?
Speaker 2:
25:47
Um, you know, how do you know what the real problems are there? I mean, we're so busy in, in our daily lives, like really what we're trying to do is to built us as like summarize a lot of that information for you and tell you what's important that you can make decisions with and you know, we think that can make you a better citizen too. Yeah. Who Do you, who reads your data? I mean who, who is, who depends upon who's a person in a Co, in a company that's actually, uh, receiving the information in making, making, making judgment calls. We generally, it's generally that the title is generally director of security. Like this role has really emerged after nine 11. So, you know, after 2001 this role became more and more important and we just see a massive increase in that. The directors of security at companies we see, you know, growing startups with directors of security, uh, and much smaller companies that are just have a global footprint.
Speaker 2:
26:43
So more, more companies are global right now, which is why, you know, travel's been an interesting area for us to be, uh, involved. Um, that tends to be the first line decision maker is that director of security. Often it's, it's intelligence analysts that are within the firm. So there are lots of different flavors of analysts out there, but, uh, the security analysts that's trying to understand, you know, the impact of policy change to supply chain or you know, weather events. Um, and you know, there's like an impact of, of, of climate change here as well. Like what things can we anticipate going forward that may, you know, cause us to, to, uh, to, to move our operations out of a country and into another one, like having a secure water supply. Um, so, you know, we help those analysts both understand what's happening in real time, but they're corporations, but also be able to anticipate, uh, you know, the advice that they should be giving to, uh, like the, the head of operations at a company.
Speaker 2:
27:47
Um, we have been introduced to supply chain, uh, through our corporate beachhead because again, security is about understanding what's happening in the impact on the assets that accompanies. So, uh, we find ourselves getting introduced from security into supply chain, into travel, into HR. And sometimes the security department has many folds do it as well. So, uh, there could be the daily operations, security in there could be like a business continuity aspect to security. We get introduced to them as well. And you know, this is again why, um, I think originally we were thinking we would have this dashboard that served everyone and we focused more and more on the data over time because, uh, there are so many use cases. We don't want to build a, a supply chain dashboard that's not where, you know, my experience comes from. Uh, and I don't, I don't think that we, uh, authentically feel we could deliver the best user experience for a product there, but we know that, that they need to have the same data as the people over insecurity and the same data as the people over in travel.
Speaker 2:
28:57
And by delivering that data to them, we can help give them a common picture of what's going on in the world. Absolutely. So, um, moving forward, how do you see yourselves differentiating from, from others in this, in the security genre? Well, I think, you know, you have to look at what, what are, what are the, what are the trends out there right now? And I think this kind of gets to the question earlier about who are your competitors? They didn't really mention who the future competitors are. So, um, you know, we've got our beachhead market or beachhead competitors, uh, they are using technology that were, was, was built, uh, really in late nineties, and you know, it's gotten a uptick because of this demand for that director of security role. Um, but, uh, the way work is going like, Hey, we've got more and more automation coming to our work.
Speaker 2:
29:56
Uh, we got more and more data that is available to us to, to make decisions. Um, we need to harness machines to, uh, assist us in that work. And so that actually puts us in a space that's more like a data provider over time. You know, and another trend is that more and more companies are becoming technology companies. So we've sold to companies where, uh, the customer, even as a security company is a software developer. And so they're going to build their own product, but they need data to feed the product. Um, so when you, when you put those things together, um, the market that will be in will look more like a, what was historically a data warehousing or, uh, by that I mean like, uh, like an IHS market, a, you know, a Bloomberg, uh, those kinds of companies where you're buying aggregated in normalized data, but you're often getting it from a person and a spreadsheet.
Speaker 2:
30:55
But in the future it's all going to be a da API and it's going to be built into a software layer. You're not selling it to an analyst anymore. You're selling it to a software developer and that's what we are doing. Right. Right. That's in longterm market. Gotcha. Gotcha. You know, thinking about it going forward, it, it's both exhilarating and exhausting, just thinking that you're not working with a, a static, um, product or market if everything is changing constantly. That's right. I mean, it's exciting and fun. Well, sure. Why would you be doing it otherwise? Right, exactly. I mean, there is a startup, there can be plenty of, uh, uh, of grind to it. I think, you know, in, in the early, the very early days, you're like, okay, is this the right, is this the right vision? And you know, you kind of do a gut check there and you push through and then you see customers start to use your product and you start to see it take off and then, you know, you're able to, to really bring in, you know, tile and tech to execute.
Speaker 2:
32:01
And, and now we see that vision becoming reality. So I think it's, uh, it's really exciting. I think we've, um, you know, not all the bets we've made have been the right ones, but many of them had. And that's given us confidence that we know where we're going. Do you think anybody really, uh, is a hundred percent accurate? Uh, I know I look at it and I think, so, uh, you guys have been around for four years. You started in 2015 and you use, I believe you started with the right bones. I mean, you had, you had the right people with the right vision and you've been adaptable and that been able to follow your, your true course, but adapting it as you go, you can, things have changed dramatically in four years. And the technologies available to us in the world until you guys in particular have changed dramatically in just four years.
Speaker 2:
32:54
Just yeah. Understanding of what that tech, I mean we are calling everything big data, artificial intelligence and machine learning. Like now everybody talks about it. Uh, and it wasn't the case a little while ago. And so, uh, I think we can also, there are also a lot of other companies that talk about artificial intelligence for security now, but now we know like the insights about what's real, what's not, you know, what are rules, what are real, what are real machine learning innovations. And we've, we've tackled some hard technical problems that had to deliver their end results. Sure, sure. So you guys are currently in a funding round you've started at fairly recently or you're doing well so far? Uh, I don't know how much detail we want to go into on the, in the, the amount that you're raising. It's, it's really up to you. But I, what I'd like to ask is what will this next funding round do for stability?
Speaker 2:
33:54
It gives us, uh, the, the, uh, really the, the bones to, to, to scale with. So, I mean, we've got the team on board to, to begin scaling, but, uh, really showing repeatability in the, in the markets so that we can run a little bit faster and to continue working on the, the deep technical problems. So adding some engineering resources to the team. Uh, and then when it comes to, to scaling, like, Hey, we've got some channel partners, we want to be able to support them, deliver the marketing, get our messaging out there. And so, uh, you know, that's going to require financial resources, but, you know, we see tremendous potential here in the ability to grow really fast, especially as some of these, these channels come online. And that's a part of the reason that, that the platform plays so appealing for us. We don't see another platform that's in the market doing quite what we're doing that aligns with uh, the future.
Speaker 2:
34:49
So, um, you know, our current round should take us into, uh, 20 to mid 2021 and get us to a, a, a healthy a run rate. Um, and you know, the, the potential to, to break even if we, if we want to, I don't know that we would do that because we see a company that can be north of $100 million in annual recurring revenue. I mean there are competitors that are out there near us that have revenues similar to that right now. So, you know, we think why not and why not us? And to your credit you actually have significant contracts. You have had those and you're exercising those. So it's not that you're looking, sitting, sitting, waiting for the, uh, for the future to happen. Your, your actually revenue generating right now. It's right. And we've had, you know, I think there are two parts of that that are really exciting.
Speaker 2:
35:45
So we've, yes, we've had to, to win and get through like procurement with like really, really demanding customers. Uh, I think that the next phase, which is also exciting, I mean, we're going to continue with the direct sales that we have, but we've made, uh, some API sales where people are just buying our data. And so, um, we plan to do more to discovery there in the near future. I mean, we have everybody from, you know, financial customers asking us for, for data, uh, like, you know, for, you know, commodities, things like that. Uh, we have logistics companies asking us for data, um, uh, supply chain companies asking us for data. And so really it's a, it's been okay, do the right discovery so that we have the right amount of focus on it, execution, uh, go after most appealing markets first where we can sell quickly.
Speaker 2:
36:37
Um, but yeah, we think our go to market approach overall has been pretty smart. [inaudible] absolutely. Absolutely. Well, I, uh, I look forward to seeing where you guys go. I, I just in this last 45 minutes of speaking with you, I have thought of probably 20 different applications, uh, both more for humanity but also for the security of product movement, the security of events. Just countless things come to mind. We're where you guys provide the underlying infrastructure and the data and then the how to get it, how to make use of it. That that's what I think most important is how do we use that data? When you look at security, it's again, it's a, it's about an understanding of the world and it's really fragmented how we deliver security and so like having a unifying knowledge base that can tie it all together is where we think we can do something really, really special.
Speaker 2:
37:31
Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. I would think from a practical standpoint too, when you travel and your family's concern, you can just show them this, the data so that to, to, to alleviate your wife's concern or you kids, you, your grandparents. I mean all the above or your own concern. I mean, I, if when, when at Grad school, like I went back to Afghanistan, I traveled through parts of Asia as a civilian and it was really eyeopening how hard it was to, to figure out what was was out there. You know, I had some experience like I could dig and that would be like plotting the hospitals that I knew would be near my hotel and Afghanistan and knew where I was going to go. Um, but that's not the kind of information that most people even think through. Uh, and then knowing how to search for the things that you were looking for was, it wasn't a typical Google search, so it took a little bit more effort.
Speaker 2:
38:33
Right. Exactly, exactly. It makes me think of one of our events a few years ago was in Ho Chi Minh City. And, uh, on our first night we had a gentleman that was joining us who had an epileptic seizure. And, uh, we were very fortunate that we had somebody with us who knew where the, where the best hospital was and, and how, and what, what we needed to do. Most of the time people do not have, have those types of resources available to them. It's not that you can't go figure out that there's a hospital out there, it's, it's getting all the information together. Like what's the good hospital, what's the one that people go to the most? And, and who would you know who, who would a a travel management company or, uh, a health service provider, uh, that works outside Vietnam recommend and, um, which one's gonna work with your insurance?
Speaker 2:
39:31
This is hard information to piece together. We really, uh, it really is, well, I love the fact that you guys are doing what you're doing and, uh, we've been involved with the, as investors, active investors and stability has, I believe since the, almost the very beginning. Yeah. No, we look forward to being a part of that moving forward as well. Would you like to have make, is there anything that we haven't covered that you'd like to, uh, get out there in this podcast? Um, the, I, I can't think of anything off the top of my head. I think introverts and corals. Yeah, exactly. If he didn't know, um, did the, uh, I mean, just really excited to be working on the problem. Like we have evolved a long way and I think like the, uh, tying what we were doing initially to division, I think we, we struggled with like how to describe that.
Speaker 2:
40:23
But really it's becoming clear now because of just what we've been able to deliver with the product. And so that's, that's really exciting. Uh, deeply appreciate the sport, James, uh, in the, the chance to talk about something that we think is really meaningful for humanity and you know, for just making the most of this life so like to be here. Absolutely. Great. Well, I appreciate your time today. I will also say to those that are listening and are watching, that's uh, if you'd like more information on stability tots, there'll be a link, uh, with the podcast to stability [inaudible] but also if, uh, for accredited investors, uh, uh, contact us at a Oberst by crown private and, uh, because we are active investors, instability us. So Greg, hey, have a great rest of your day and thanks very much for joining me. Thanks for, yeah, thanks for the Chat James.
Speaker 2:
41:17
It was fun and I look forward to seeing you again soon. Since our start in 2012 the obras and our members have invested in more than 60 deals. Stability. Todd's is a good example of a deal that has a, that served us extremely, uh, moving forward. If you're an investor and you're intrigued by my interview with Greg, uh, or the other investment topics that we cover in the global investor podcast, I have two recommendations for you today. One is head over to obras invest.com and learn about obras. Learn about the group. Uh, we are accepting new members accredited and as in credit investors, uh, that's Ob r I s I n v e s t.com. And number two, a recommendation is you join us in Panama. We are having our global investors summit and Panama City at the led Meridian hotel from July 15th to the 20th.
Speaker 2:
42:16
It is not too late to sign up to purchase a ticket. Uh, and really there's no better way to experience obras, uh, and everything that we have to offer. Then by attending one of our events. Uh, it'll be a week of significant investor insights, a lot of learning, uh, deal presentations of companies that we have, uh, vetted and our offering to our members for investment, as well as getting to know [inaudible] members. And, uh, you can't miss the opportunity to experience the sights and sounds of Panama City. Uh, so visit us@overusinvest.com slash Panama 2019 our members and guests are an amazing group of self-made and accomplished investors. Uh, they come from 15 countries and a wide variety of professions. We share the common pursuit of surrounding ourselves with great people in great places and with gaining significant returns on our investments. Thanks for joining me this week. See you in Panama and see you at our next podcast. Have a great day.
Speaker 1:
43:34
[inaudible].